About me.

I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Stanford University where I work with Douglas Rivers, Morris Fiorina, and David Brady. I obtained a PhD in Political Science in July 2019 from the University of California, Merced.

I study how people use information to make decisions with methodology ranging from experimental studies and instrumental variables to spatial models and new measures.


Publications. 

LeVeck, Brad L. and Stephanie A. Nail. (2016). “Evidence for a scale invariant relationship between the incumbency advantage and the nationalization of US House elections 1866–2014.” Research and Politics 3(4): 1-4.


Working papers. 

  1. Nail, Stephanie A. (2017). “Strategic Agenda Setting and Election Timing in the U.S. House.” Dissertation Paper. ** UC Merced Political Science Best Graduate Student Paper (2016) **

  2. Nail, Stephanie A. (2017). “Disjoint Delegations: Disentangling the Effect of Party Label on Inference.” Dissertation Paper.  ** UC Merced Political Science Best Graduate Student Paper (2017) **

  3. Nail, Stephanie A. (2019). “How Much Will Voters Pay for a “Bit” of Information?” Dissertation Paper. (Job Market Paper). ** UC Merced Political Science Best Graduate Student Paper (2019) ** 

  4. LeVeck, Brad L. and Stephanie A. Nail. (2019). “The Informational Value of Party Labels and Legislator Voting Records.” (Under review).

  5. Nail, Stephanie A. (2018). “Ineffective Attribution Testing: An exploration of individual differences in cognition between Liberals and Conservatives.” ** UC Merced Political Science Best Graduate Student Paper (2018) ** 

  6. Theodoridis, Alexander G., Stephanie A. Nail, and Graham Bullock. (2018). “It’s the End of the World as We Know It? Utility for Outcomes and the Structure of Opinion on Climate Change.”

  7. Fortunato, David, Matthew L. Hibbing, and Stephanie A. Nail. (2018). “Strategic Voting: An Investigation of Preferences and Voting Behavior.”

  8. Goggin, Stephen N., Stephanie A.Nail, and Alexander G. Theodoridis (2019). “Partisan Cognition.” In Oxford Encyclopedia of Political Decision Making ed. David R.  Redlawsk.